College Paper Writing

HOW TO WRITE A REVIEW PAPER

Do not know how to start your paper? Afraid you will skip something? This post is filled with tips and tricks that will help you when you write a review paper. I know how stressful writing papers can be and I want to rid you of some of that panic.  When I first got to college I had no clue how to write a review paper. This easy guide will take you through that process. This is the guide I wish I had as a freshman.

Save these quick tips for your next paper. These reminders will help you stay on track and keep within your professor’s guidelines.

1. CREATING YOUR COVER PAGE

This page introduces your topic, states who you are, and records the date. This page may or may not include your professors name, your academic institution, course number and/or course tite. There are so many ways to create a cover page, but if you are not sure how to create one you can follow my example image.

2. FORMING YOUR ABSTRACT

Now that you have introduced yourself with your cover page, it is time to give a brief preview of the contents of your review paper. The abstract is a summary of your entire paper, from the introduction to the conclusion. It should only be 150-300 words long and can be on its own page. In most cases it is justified, but not indented. Although, this is going to be the second part of your paper… it is easier to write this section last.

3. THE TABLE OF CONTENTS

Your table of contents should be an organized list of headings and subheadings. You should indicate which page each section is found on.

4. INTRODUCING YOUR PAPER

This is a great time to give your readers any background information that will help them understand your review paper. 

This includes, but is not limited to:

  • How much research has been done on this topic?
  • Why was that research important and what impact did it have?
  • Define any important terms
  • Explain any important procedures

5. BUILDING THE BODY

Now you can get into the works you are reviewing. The body of the paper should cover the Introduction-Conclusion of each of the works you are reviewing. Remember to cite whenever you use someone else’s words. Your professor might ask you to separate the information from each paper by using subheadings.

6. DEVELOPING THE CONCLUSION 

The conclusion of the paper will focus on all of the key findings from each of the works you covered.

7. CITING YOUR WORK

To wrap up your paper you can reference all of the works covered in your paper, including the information used in your introduction. 

See, that wasn’t so bad! Now you know how to write a review paper.

You may also like...

2 Comments

  1. Jacques says:

    It’s really helpful and definitely provides a solid foundation for writing review papers. I wish I had this blog when I first started college. It would’ve helped me immensely in my freshman year classes!

    1. Thank you for reading my blog! 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *